98  Calo/Beron: Milonga Que Peina Canas

ARTICLE INDEX


Date: Thu, 19 Jul 2001 16:33:47 -0500
From: Stephen Brown <Stephen.P.Brown@DAL.FRB.ORG>
Subject: Calo/Beron: Milonga Que Peina Canas

Can anyone tell me of a CD that contains the Miguel Calo/Raul Beron
recording of Milonga Que Peina Canas?

With best regards,
Steve (de Tejas)




Date: Thu, 19 Jul 2001 21:37:29 -0800
From: Dan Boccia <redfox@ALASKA.NET>
Subject: Re: Calo/Beron: Milonga Que Peina Canas

{" Can anyone tell me of a CD that contains the Miguel Calo/Raul Beron
recording of Milonga Que Peina Canas?"}

With best regards,
Steve (de Tejas)


This is a nice milonga on at least 2 currently available albums:

On the Reliquias label: "Sus Exitos con Podesta, Ortiz, y Beron", track 18.
This is a superb album with several excellent tracks, including some
excellent valses. Sound quality is outstanding - definitely one of my
favorite Calo albums and highly recommended. Here's the track listing:

http://www.tangostore.com/spanish/index.php?d=info&idx34

Also another album that contains this song: "Milongas Pa' Sacarle Viruta Al
Piso". This is a compilation of milongas, several of which are from the
50's and beyond. I don't reach for it very often when I'm DJing but it does
have some nice tracks and some that are hard to find otherwise. Here's the
track listing:

http://www.tangostore.com/spanish/index.php?d=info&idxg8

The track listings above are from Zival's in Bs As, but Mark Celaya of
Classic Tangos also has both of them:

http://www.classictango.com/reliquas.htm

http://www.classictango.com/misc.htm

With pleasure -

Dan




Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2001 07:52:25 +0200
From: Hannes Rieger <hrieger@GMX.DE>
Subject: Re: Calo/Beron: Milonga Que Peina Canas

Hi Stephen,

> Can anyone tell me of a CD that contains the Miguel Calo/Raul Beron
> recording of Milonga Que Peina Canas?

the only CD I know containing this record is
FM: Milongas... Pa' Sacarle Viruta Al Piso
EMI 8 28544-2

Greetings
Hannes




Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2001 13:14:10 -0700
From: Sergio <sergio@NCINTER.NET>
Subject: Milonga

I am surprised to see that milonga seems to be more difficult to dance than
tango.
I always thought the opposite.
Milonga is one of tango roots therefore it has some genetical similarities.
The musical notation is 2x4, this means 2 quarter notes (blacks in European
notation) per musical segment.
This is the same as the original tangos, such as those played by "Tuba
Tango" or "Los muchachos de antes", which are sometimes difficult to
distinguish from milongas.
It is said that tango obtained its choreography from milonga. Its melody and
emotional strength from the Habanera and its rhythm from Candombe. The
Andalusian tanguillo probably gave its dignity and feeling. There are some
investigators that feel that tango is a brother rather than a son of those
other dances.
The primitive bands were formed by violin, flute and guitar. Those tangos
the same as milonga have a fast, upbeat, happy rhythm. It was later that
perhaps due to Italian influence tango became more melancholic, this was
accentuated by the inclusion of Bandoneon and the notation change from 2x4
to 4x4 (4 quarter notes per beat).
Milonga then is one of several tango roots. As tango evolved it slowed down,
became more melancholic and developed a different choreography.
Milonga is easier to dance because one steps on every beat, pauses are
determined by the music that at times stops, it is danced in close embrace.
The technique is particular in the sense that moves are adapted to the fast
beat.
It cannot be danced with the same technique as tango since it is a different
dance. Ochos, both front and back require an adaptation (shorter, fast
steps, hips remain more aligned with the partner). The leader changes his
choreography during the executions of ochos in milonga. Finally there is
more use of 'contrapaso' and syncopations.
Perhaps one of the most important elements is to dance in close embrace and
acquire a good understanding of the beat.
If you start by learning musicality and then dance in close embrace you will
discover that actually milonga is much easier to learn and dance than tango.
Happy milongas to everybody.




Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 05:41:43 -0800
From: Bruno <romerob@TELUSPLANET.NET>
Subject: Milonga

Wonder if anybody has used Corriditas, Cortes, Quebradas, and Sentadas to
dance Milonga?
At a recent Milonga workshop we were encouraged to use more upper body
language and less feet movement. Also, we were encouraged to leave out
standard dance steps (i.e., traspies) and standard tango steps. This
approach to dance Milonga seems to zero in the old ways to dance Milonga
with Corriditas, Cortes, Quebradas, and Sentadas.

A Quebrada can mean something different for some dancers, but for the sake
of brevity a Quebrada is when the man leads the woman to dissociate the
torso from from the waist in a series of small steps. A quebrada is preceded
by a "Corte" a sudden stop in the dance after a "Corridita" (small walking
steps). The Corte and the Quebrada may follow a Sentada -- this is when the
man invites the woman to sit on his right or left leg depending on the
position of the legs at the time of the dance.

Would like to know if you have other definitions as to what constitutes a
Corridita, Corte, Quebrada, Sentada.

Tango Regards,

Bruno




Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 22:31:54 +0900
From: astrid <astrid@RUBY.PLALA.OR.JP>
Subject: Re: Milonga

> Wonder if anybody has used Corriditas, Cortes, Quebradas, and Sentadas to
> dance Milonga?

A quebrada is preceded

> by a "Corte" a sudden stop in the dance after a "Corridita" (small walking
> steps). The Corte and the Quebrada may follow a Sentada -- this is when

the

> man invites the woman to sit on his right or left leg depending on the
> position of the legs at the time of the dance.
>
> Would like to know if you have other definitions as to what constitutes a
> Corridita, Corte, Quebrada, Sentada.
>

I would like to know too. The explanations on quebradas that I found so far,
have always sounded rather nebulous to me, and most people seem not to be
able to answer questions about them at all.
Yes, I have done those quebradas, if that is what they are. You mean that
series of tiny ochos with feet closed almost all the time, don't you? Or did
I get this wrong?
But I am dumbfounded on what a sentada is doing inside a milonga. When is
there time in the music to sit on a man's leg ? I have been taught how to
end up on a man's thigh in a crude step during canyengue, taught by Gloria
and Eduardo, but in a different position from "sitting", but I don't think,
the dancers ever come to full stop during a milonga.




Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 07:37:57 -0800
From: Bruno <romerob@TELUSPLANET.NET>
Subject: Re: Milonga

Astrid,
A series of tiny ochos with feet closed almost all the time would fit the
definition of a "Corridita" or "Quebrada" depending on the dancer. Another
definition of what constitutes a Quebrada is when the man leads the woman to
dissociate the torso in cut/stacatto/pulsating movements. While in an
embrace hold and the couple are doing a walking step (Corridita)let's say
the man performs a sudden stop as he freezes doing a "Corte", and he begins
using his upper torso to accompany the rhythm of the Milonga. The upper
torso movements may be represented with slight rocking movement, these
movements are done isolated from the waist. The best Quebradas depend on the
dexterity of the man in dissociating his torso from the waist, and
transmiting the movements to the woman.

What a sentada is doing inside a milonga?
It depends on the interpretation of the man and what movement he feels is
more appropriate after let's say doing a "Quebrada". The man may be holding
the beat in the music when he leads the "Sentada". Another reason he could
use a Sentada is that he may want to shine in the dance (para lucirse).

The choreography language of Cortes and Quebradas may have been erased from
the minds of the people when these were banned in the dance halls as it was
considered a sinful dance associated with compadritos et al.

Tango Greetings,

Bruno




Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 00:10:23 +0900
From: astrid <astrid@RUBY.PLALA.OR.JP>
Subject: Re: Milonga

Another

> definition of what constitutes a Quebrada is when the man leads the woman

to

> dissociate the torso in cut/stacatto/pulsating movements. While in an
> embrace hold and the couple are doing a walking step (Corridita)let's say
> the man performs a sudden stop as he freezes doing a "Corte", and he

begins

> using his upper torso to accompany the rhythm of the Milonga. The upper
> torso movements may be represented with slight rocking movement, these
> movements are done isolated from the waist. The best Quebradas depend on

the

> dexterity of the man in dissociating his torso from the waist, and
> transmiting the movements to the woman.

Oh, yes, I know those, and they are what I gathered, a quebrada would
probably mean. However, in all my tango years, I have met one or two men who
were able to lead this, and it just makes you melt away. I remember, how one
day, I tried to teach this to my partner, in his earlier tango days, when we
were practising alone (since noone I meet ever seems to teach this move in
classes) He started jiggling me in a way, that I thought, I could almost
hear my vertebrae rattle. ; ) "No", I said, "not like this, with more
feeling !" He tried again, a little more gently. "More gently, and slower
too !", I said. He tried again, slower, but still with a few jerks in it.
"You have to make more of a connection, you have to let me rest against your
chest !" Finally, after a couple more tries, we gave up, and I thought, I'd
ask him to try again in half a year or so. Still, we have been on friendly
terms ever since. ; )
It seems, this movement is only for those who can make a real conncetion
with their bodies, who know how to express love in the dance, who are
naturally affectionate, and, to make it easy, have some Argentine blood
running through their veins.

>
> The choreography language of Cortes and Quebradas may have been erased

from

> the minds of the people when these were banned in the dance halls as it

was

> considered a sinful dance associated with compadritos et al.
>

Yes, the "tango sin cortes y quebradas" phase. Pity that they did not
reintroduce it properly.

Astrid




Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 14:28:12 -0500
From: Marianne Hansen <mhansen@BRYNMAWR.EDU>
Subject: Re: milonga

At 04:23 PM 12/18/2003 -0500, Bruce Stephens wrote:

>One (female) teacher made a related point while teaching a workshop on
>decorations.
>Her argument was that once upon a time, milonga was danced almost all
>in a simple rhythm, and that women would often decorate elaborately....


Does anyone on the list dance milonga this way? Or have you seen it? Know
anyone who teaches it?

I'm another one who loves the milonga, but this idea is new to me and I'd
like to know more about it.
Marianne




Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 21:16:51 +0000
From: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Milonga

Milonga may be danced in many ways. It could be danced single timing, double
timing, mixing both single and double rhythms.

The ornaments are done with precision and rapidly to fit the rhythm.

Front and back ochos are done in a specific way to fit the milonga character
and beat.

There are barridas (dragging of the foot).

Cadence steps. Jumps, hooks, shining of the shoe, different turns including
free ones, rapid vines, corridas, changes of front, etc.

There are multiple playful steps that use double timing.

Milonga is one of the ancestors of tango. It originated in rural areas where
gauchos competed improvising philosophical discussions to guitar
accompaniment (Payadas). It gave birth to Tango and evolved into the modern
milonga.

The universe of tango is immense. One can decide to concentrate in a small
area or try to learn the basic trilogy of Tango, Milonga and Vals and then
at the very least two tango styles Salon and milonguero. This certainly
will reflect degree of interest, time dedicated to dancing and skill to
understand the music and character of the different dances .

It s our best dial-up Internet access offer: 6 months @$9.95/month. Get it




Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 21:32:29 +0000
From: Oleh Kovalchuke <oleh_k@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Re: Milonga

Sergio wrote about milonga steps:
">Front and back ochos are done in a specific way to fit the milonga

>character and beat.
>
>There are barridas (dragging of the foot).

"

Barridas?! I cannot drag to milonga. There is no the swaying, milonga feel
in this step.
I would love to see it done though.

Cheers, Oleh K.

http://TangoSpring.com


>From: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@HOTMAIL.COM>
>Reply-To: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@HOTMAIL.COM>
>To: TANGO-L@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
>Subject: [TANGO-L] Milonga
>Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 21:16:51 +0000
>
>Milonga may be danced in many ways. It could be danced single timing,
>double
>timing, mixing both single and double rhythms.
>
>The ornaments are done with precision and rapidly to fit the rhythm.
>
>Front and back ochos are done in a specific way to fit the milonga
>character
>and beat.
>
>There are barridas (dragging of the foot).
>
>Cadence steps. Jumps, hooks, shining of the shoe, different turns
>including
>free ones, rapid vines, corridas, changes of front, etc.
>
>There are multiple playful steps that use double timing.
>
>Milonga is one of the ancestors of tango. It originated in rural areas
>where
>gauchos competed improvising philosophical discussions to guitar
>accompaniment (Payadas). It gave birth to Tango and evolved into the modern
>milonga.
>
>The universe of tango is immense. One can decide to concentrate in a small
>area or try to learn the basic trilogy of Tango, Milonga and Vals and then
>at the very least two tango styles Salon and milonguero. This certainly
>will reflect degree of interest, time dedicated to dancing and skill to
>understand the music and character of the different dances .
>
>It s our best dial-up Internet access offer: 6 months @$9.95/month. Get it

Working moms: Find helpful tips here on managing kids, home, work and




Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 15:12:18 -0700
From: Tom Stermitz <Stermitz@RAGTIME.ORG>
Subject: Re: Milonga

Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@HOTMAIL.COM> said:

>Milonga is one of the ancestors of tango. It originated in rural areas where
>gauchos competed improvising philosophical discussions to guitar
>accompaniment (Payadas). It gave birth to Tango and evolved into the modern
>milonga.

Again...in my understanding this is incorrect.

MILONGA WAS NOT AN ANCESTOR OF THE TANGO. There was once a dance
called the milonga, it could have been gaucho, but it is something
else, not something that became tango.

The modern milonga dates to the 1930s when tango music slowed down,
and milonga music sped up a little, sometimes adding candombe
elements.
--

Tom Stermitz
http://www.tango.org/
stermitz@tango.org
303-388-2560




Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 16:20:28 -0600
From: Stephen Brown <Stephen.P.Brown@DAL.FRB.ORG>
Subject: Re: Milonga

I occasionally use a barrida while dancing milonga. It's not that
difficult to fit it to the music of medium tempo or slower milongas, if
the woman has a good feel for milonga and you treat the barrida as an
illusion that can be executed during a turn while the woman is taking a
side step following her back step. The tricky part can come with her next
step, which must be executed within the sensibility of milonga.

--Steve




Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2003 18:19:30 +0900
From: astrid <astrid@RUBY.PLALA.OR.JP>
Subject: Re: Milonga

> There are barridas (dragging of the foot).
> Jumps, hooks, shining of the shoe, different turns including
> free ones, rapid vines, corridas, changes of front, etc.

Barridas,jumps, hooks (meaning ganchos, right?), shining of the shoe..?

Excuse me, I have danced milonga for years, but have never seen anything
like this done during milonga.
You sure, you are not simply trying to use tango steps to fit milonga music?


Astrid





Date: Thu, 30 Sep 2004 16:25:51 -0700
From: Jay Jenkins <jayjenkins888@YAHOO.COM>
Subject: Milonga

From Carlos Lima's posting:

"The old milonga music & dance is probably very much a local creacio'n
portenna from multiple European sources and the rural folklore.

The use of milonga for the place may have been related to times when milongas
and perigundines had fixed locations in the night-life scene.The use of milonga for the place may have been related to times when milongas
and perigundines had fixed locations in the night-life scene."

My impression is that,

The milonga was created in rural areas, not in the city of Buenos Aires as you suggest by the use of the word portenna.
As to multiple European sources, I doubt it. The guitar arrived in Argentina with the Spaniards. If there is any musical influence on those early milongas it has to be from Spain.

The use of milonga for the place was no "pirigundin" ( dancing hall patronized by people of low social class - also same but of doubtful moral standard). It is well established that it originated in some kind of rap competition in the country side.

My dear Carlos I suggest that you take a little time to research the subject for your notes better. I find some degree of irresponsibility in the fact that you spread erroneous concepts (even when you cover yourself under the guise of pure speculation).

So be a good boy, go home and study a little more.

Cheers, as well, Jay











Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2008 14:04:01 +0000
From: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Milonga
To: Tango-L List <tango-l@mit.edu>


Most tango historians give as roots of our tango : Milonga, Habanera, Canyengue and the ''Tanguillo Espa?ol''.

The milonga originated in Argentine rural areas and is known as Milonga Campera (rural milonga) to differentiate it from the moder milonga or (City Milonga) .

See Sebastian Piana.


Sergio

Watch ?Cause Effect,? a show about real people making a real difference.
http://im.live.com/Messenger/IM/MTV/?source=text_watchcause





Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 12:21:36 -0800 (PST)
From: "Trini y Sean (PATangoS)" <patangos@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Milonga
To: tango-l@mit.edu
Cc: PATangoS <patangos@yahoo.com>


--- Mario <sopelote@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Hi, here is my Milonga Playlist on Youtube:
> http://www.youtube.com/my_playlists?p%8B1FD6C731EA19
> 16 Milonga videos.. ...the first one is pf Hugo Daniel
> doing his Milonga moves alone in front of a class..

Mario:
I couldn't access your playlist, but I assume this is the
video you're referring to of Hugo Daniel. It is fun to
watch. Thanks for sharing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGUfq77q0e4


Martin:
I'm curious as to whether the women you're referring to
tend toward open or close-embrace or have no preference.
The reason I'm asking is that in my own studies and
observations, doing traspie is more difficult if a woman
studies open-embrace, but it is much easier if she studies
close-embrace. Years ago, when my teachers would travel to
NYC, they would come back and teach milonga caminita. Back
then, everything was open-embrace. Until folks started
working on close-embrace did traspie start to work for them
(both men & women).

Also, regarding a basic milonga caminita pattern, there are
some teachers (such as Fecundo Pasadas) who do 2,4,6, or 8
count patterns. These are basically a forward step &
close, resolucion, box steps, and salida basica.
Musically, it's one step per beat. They are also done is a
zigzag pattern, so navigation is another issue. Perhaps
this is what the follower was talking about. Traspie
doesn't figure much into this initially, and is often seen
as more advanced. You will often see milonga workshops
divided in levels in this way.

For those starting out with milonga traspie in close, there
are no patterns to memorize. It's more of a question of
catching the rhythm. Navigation can be done in a straight
line. For these folks, traspie isn't viewed as advanced.
For some it would be challenging, as any new step would be,
but not advanced.

This could account for some of our different observations.

Trini de Pittsburgh


PATangoS - Pittsburgh Argentine Tango Society
Our Mission: To make Argentine Tango Pittsburgh?s most popular social dance!
http://patangos.home.comcast.net/




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Date: Sat, 3 May 2008 16:00:55 -0400 (EDT)
From: "Keith Elshaw" <keith@totango.net>
Subject: [Tango-L] Milonga
To: tango-l@mit.edu
<61803.65.93.195.126.1209844855.squirrel@webmail5.pair.com>

It WAS given to us by the gods to bless our souls with joy and happiness.

But, it seems to me, the essence of milonga is not immediately devined by
the new lover of tango. Milonga is like tango itself; also like what an
interesting woman may do to an ardent gentleman admirer: kind of retreat
behind a veil while the pilgrim makes his journey to a sufficient level of
understanding that the veil may be safely let down for admittance.

My personal intuition is that there is kind of a path a good many people
follow in getting all the way to "getting" tango. We fall in love with the
tango dance; we eventually discover the joys of vals; after that, the
milonga is more accessible.

But, few there seem to be in the lands outside of Argentina who have a
feel for milonga.

The reason for this could be that, being in 2/4, it has the feeling of
being "fast." Dancers who start to enjoy it and sense the fun tend to
"run." Many orchestras have recorded milonga at a tempo pushing the limit
because that's what one does for shows.

So, many will use milonga to kind-of show-off. Even before they have the
skills to do so. In North America, one sees many men just running and
pushing and flailing around - not providing much enjoyment for the
followers who have to run to keep up. Those men are having fun, which is
good. But, the milonga veil is still up for them - or they would not be
that way.

I can only speak of personal experience and that may not be worth much.
But for whatever it's worth, I offer that milonga reveals its true nature
when danced slowly.

Those who attend my milongas or dance milonga with me know that I favour
the slow and moderate-tempo milongas first of all. Canaro (the Master);
Donato (a Genius); and of course moving up the tempo scale to Di Sarli,
D'Arienzo and Troilo (Genius Masters as well).

The veil has been lifted when one enjoys the SLOW milongas (if I may say).

Milonga danced well is very subtle. No wild movements. No running. I
always teach that - though it is very exciting music - the dancer should
be very calm and peaceful inside to dance it well. Purposefully put the
excitement meter on low. Slow the beating heart. Then everything opens up.

When I met with and interviewed maestro Roberto Alvarez of Color Tango, I
told him that to use his milongas when I dj, I slowed them down (without
changing the pitch) 3 B.P.M. so that they are danceable. (He did not take
offense).

You have to breathe when dancing milonga. You can't breathe properly if
your are running.

I recognize that fast milongas bring a lot of joy to many, many dancers. I
play them. But, I work my way up to them. Starting off a milonga tanda
with a really fast milonga doesn't make sense to me, musically. Start with
a slow one; go up in tempo; finish with a fast one. This is my way, at
least.

If the reader is not a milonga fan at this time, please know that your
tango will be much more satisfying to you when you have become a milonga
dancer whom others enjoy dancing it with.

To be a really good tango dancer, it seems one must have a beautiful vals
and a beautiful milonga in them as well. Then, you can dance tango.

All good tango dancers know it.

With kind regards,

Keith

ToTANGO.net


























Date: Sat, 3 May 2008 16:15:59 -0500
From: "Tango Society of Central Illinois" <tango.society@gmail.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Milonga
To: Tango-L <tango-l@mit.edu>
<cff24c340805031415x4b0068f8k6595d660fc88973b@mail.gmail.com>

On Sat, May 3, 2008 at 3:00 PM, Keith Elshaw <keith@totango.net> wrote:

But, few there seem to be in the lands outside of Argentina who have a
feel for milonga.

The reason for this could be that, being in 2/4, it has the feeling of
being "fast." Dancers who start to enjoy it and sense the fun tend to
"run." Many orchestras have recorded milonga at a tempo pushing the limit
because that's what one does for shows.

I'm not sure what milongas you're referring to that were recorded for
shows. I doubt this was case with the milongas recorded during the 30s
and 40s. Canaro has numerous fast milongas (e.g., 'Milonga brava',
'Parque patricios', 'No hay tierra como la mia') as does Troilo (e.g.,
'Mano brava', 'De pura cepa', 'Ficha de oro') that are standards used
by DJs in Buenos Aires milongas.

So, many will use milonga to kind-of show-off. Even before they have the
skills to do so. In North America, one sees many men just running and
pushing and flailing around - not providing much enjoyment for the
followers who have to run to keep up.

I can only speak of personal experience and that may not be worth much.
But for whatever it's worth, I offer that milonga reveals its true nature
when danced slowly.

Yes. The key is to take smaller steps and to collect before moving on.
Or using movements that bring the feet together frequently (e.g.,
vai-ven, which incidentally also connects with the '1&2' rhyhtm often
prominent in the bass line of the milonga).

Those who attend my milongas or dance milonga with me know that I favour
the slow and moderate-tempo milongas first of all. Canaro (the Master);
Donato (a Genius); and of course moving up the tempo scale to Di Sarli,
D'Arienzo and Troilo (Genius Masters as well).

The slow milongas of Canaro are a treasure. Thank you Keith for making
available on your restoration CD collection such gems as 'Negrito; and
'Milonga del 900' which are not readily available in the CD series to
which we normally have access.

Milonga danced well is very subtle. No wild movements. No running. I
always teach that - though it is very exciting music - the dancer should
be very calm and peaceful inside to dance it well. Purposefully put the
excitement meter on low. Slow the beating heart. Then everything opens up.

I was blessed to see milongueros Pocho and Nelly do a demo to Canaro's
'Milonga del 900' at the recent Chicago Tango Festival. It is exactly
as you say. I see their compact and deliberate yet fully rhythmic
style as a wonderful role model for dancers.

I recognize that fast milongas bring a lot of joy to many, many dancers. I
play them. But, I work my way up to them. Starting off a milonga tanda
with a really fast milonga doesn't make sense to me, musically. Start with
a slow one; go up in tempo; finish with a fast one. This is my way, at
least.

When I DJ I try to keep the tempo as constant as possible throughout a
tanda, whether it is tango, milonga or vals. This is because as a
dancer I choose different partners based on the tempo of the music and
changing the tempo a lot during a tanda can can change the quality of
the dance.

Ron





Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2008 11:31:36 -0800
From: flame@2xtreme.net
Subject: [Tango-L] Milonga
To: tango-l@mit.edu

Here's one of my favorite milongas. El Pibe Sarandi & Elina Roldan.
http://hk.youtube.com/watch?v=xS5Bw2fKoYA

Diane




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