244  'dance sneakers' in Spanish

ARTICLE INDEX


Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 12:18:18 -0700
From: Marisa Holmes <mariholmes@YAHOO.COM>
Subject: 'dance sneakers' in Spanish

I am about to have to negotiate the issue of footwear
in a one-time tango class. Although the instructors
have no doubt seen dance sneakers before, can anyone
tell me how to say 'dance sneakers' in Spanish?

Thanks!
Marisa





Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 01:16:41 -0700
From: H Dickinson <hyladlmp@YAHOO.COM>
Subject: Dance sneakers

I think the dancing sneakers referred to are the type
with the split sole, originally used for hip-hop.
There are many different brands, styles, etc.

I use them for long dance weekends, practicas and
workshops, especially in places with an unsprung
floor, or a cement floor, or an outdoor milonga on
marble, etc., etc....The ones I use have a suede sole,
and a thicker padding under the ball of the foot.
They pivot better than rubber soles, and as well as my
high heels. I got them from Jorge Nel ("Mr. Tango").
They are bulky. I have seen styles recently that are
much more streamlined. I've used jazz shoes which are
light and streamlined, but I have to put in gel pads
and arch supports and spongy pads if there is cement
flooring and/or more than 10 hours of dancing per
weekend involved.

I agree with Christian that the bulkiness is the worst
part, sometimes it gets clumsy. And when you are
doing sandwiches and fun playing with feet, little
touches etc., they do muffle the sensation a bit. But
if my metatarsal heads are being ground into dust, my
feet get pretty clumsy anyway, and those cute touches
hardly register through the haze of pain.

Do dance sneaks look tacky? Yeah, sure, but knee
braces and feet with permanent nerve damage look way
tackier. I like to get dressed up (I mean really
really dressed up, like killer to the nines far out
dressed up) for milongas, but I figure that after the
first four hours, everyone has seen me at my best, and
since my hair is now all sweaty and sticking out and
the makeup around my right eye has all rubbed off onto
the cheeks of my last six leads, surely it doesn't
matter if I change into my tacky looking comfy
foot-saving shoes? It's never ever kept anyone from
dancing with me (or if it did, I was dancing too much
to notice).

Hyla




Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger.




Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2008 19:06:45 -0800
From: <dancetango@oaklodge.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: <tango-l@mit.edu>

I am looking to purchase Rosetta Stone language course and I have a choice
Of regular Spanish or Latin America Spanish.

What version of Spanish do they speak in Buenos Aires ?









Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 04:11:52 +0100
From: "Christian L?then" <christian.luethen@gmx.net>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: tango-l@mit.edu


> I am looking to purchase Rosetta Stone language course and I have a choice
> Of regular Spanish or Latin America Spanish.
>
> What version of Spanish do they speak in Buenos Aires ?


"castellano" ... argentinian spanish!


Argentina lies in Latin America! So this should be the closest! :-)


Christian

--
Sensationsangebot verl?ngert: GMX FreeDSL - Telefonanschluss + DSL
f?r nur 16,37 Euro/mtl.!* http://dsl.gmx.de/?ac=OM.AD.PD003K1308T4569a





Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2008 21:30:25 -0700
From: Tom Stermitz <stermitz@tango.org>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: Tango-L <tango-l@mit.edu>

Neither.

On Dec 30, 2008, at 8:06 PM, <dancetango@oaklodge.com> wrote:

> I am looking to purchase Rosetta Stone language course and I have a
> choice
> Of regular Spanish or Latin America Spanish.
>
> What version of Spanish do they speak in Buenos Aires ?






Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 09:54:05 -0800 (PST)
From: Mario <sopelote@yahoo.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: tango-l@mit.edu

Much more effective than the Rosetta stone (which won't work) would be
to find an Argentine near you and pay him/her to talk to you for a half hour
about the most simple but common subjects..his family, biography, activities..etc.
record it (digital uploadable is best) listen to it and then return with him to explain
the meaning to you....then, (here is the important part)..listen to the same recording
every day until you know and can anticipate every phrase...now, you have a good
start... go back and do another half hour with this person...continue like this
and you will get something real that will eventualy give you the idiom without
you having to think and remember , translate it.
Tom got it right 'Neither' is the only answer to such a question.
Here give a listen for yourself:?
?http://www.tn.com.ar/http://www.tn.com.ar/
?







Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 14:02:32 -0500
From: Martin Waxman <martin@waxman.net>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: Mario <sopelote@yahoo.com>, tango-l@mit.edu

Or read the daily edition of Minuto Uno for current usage of
Castellano in Argentina.
http://www.minutouno.com/

Marty






Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 20:29:09 +0000
From: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: Tango-L List <tango-l@mit.edu>


"Or read the daily edition of Minuto Uno for current usage of Castellano in Argentina.http://www.minutouno.com/ Marty"

Remember that the written Spanish is almost the same in all the countries that speak this language. It is in the spoken language where some differences may be present.

This will not cause any problem with being understood. You will always be understood in any place.

The differences inside regions of each country or from country to country may be less than in the USA going from New York to Boston or to Texas.

Many Europeans come to Argentina to study the language but whatever you study at home will get you on the right track to learn more and more. It is a long process.

I am fairly good (my native language is Spanish) with English, French and Italian, now I entertain myself trying to learn German.

I just finished reading a book (that has parallel text - German on one side and English on the other) 'Metamorphosis" by Franz Kafka.

I recommend this type of reading at certain point, when you start understanding more.

Latin American Spanish may be closer to the way we speak in Argentina.

Most of the 500 million people that speak Spanish do it as it is done in Latin America.

Best regards, Sergio



Send e-mail faster without improving your typing skills.
http://windowslive.com/online/hotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_hotmail_acq_speed_122008





Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 13:45:47 -0700
From: "Edmundo" <erueda1@elp.rr.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: "Sergio Vandekier" <sergiovandekier990@hotmail.com>
Cc: tango-l@mit.edu

An important side of this topic that has not been mentioned is that in
Argentina they speak Castilian Spanish peppered with Lunfardo, a type of
Spanish slang. As a native Mexican, I have never had any problems being
understood in my six visits to Buenos Aires. Nevertheless, I have had
embarrassing problems with some of the terminology as to what is acceptable
in Mexico may have a totally different meaning in Argentina. I have put my
foot in my mouth many times.

MUNDO
----- Original Message -----



Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2008 1:29 PM
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish


>
> "Or read the daily edition of Minuto Uno for current usage of Castellano
> in Argentina.http://www.minutouno.com/ Marty"
>
> Remember that the written Spanish is almost the same in all the countries
> that speak this language. It is in the spoken language where some
> differences may be present.
>
> This will not cause any problem with being understood. You will always be
> understood in any place.
>
> The differences inside regions of each country or from country to country
> may be less than in the USA going from New York to Boston or to Texas.
>
> Many Europeans come to Argentina to study the language but whatever you
> study at home will get you on the right track to learn more and more. It
> is a long process.
>
> I am fairly good (my native language is Spanish) with English, French and
> Italian, now I entertain myself trying to learn German.
>
> I just finished reading a book (that has parallel text - German on one
> side and English on the other) 'Metamorphosis" by Franz Kafka.
>
> I recommend this type of reading at certain point, when you start
> understanding more.
>
> Latin American Spanish may be closer to the way we speak in Argentina.
>
> Most of the 500 million people that speak Spanish do it as it is done in
> Latin America.
>
> Best regards, Sergio
>
>
>
> Send e-mail faster without improving your typing skills.
> http://windowslive.com/online/hotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_hotmail_acq_speed_122008






Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 16:30:33 -0500
From: Angela Maria <angelaml38@aol.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish

Most commercial ?language learning programs have been ineffective as a tool for learning languages. One learns a language by living it and interacting with other people.
Spanish or castellano are well understood in all countries of L.A. and Spain. The difference of the?Spanish heard?is due to the? different cultural influences in the language, derived from Indian, European, and African ancestry; in addition to the jerga?or coloquial language as in the?case of Lunfardo in?Argentina.? Furthermore, while traveling through Spanish speaking countries, you will have some humorus experiences?as to?the meaning of some words due to their own regionalism.These differences one can also?notice in French while in France, Switzerland or Canada.

Learning languages requires a lot of listening, being open to make mistakes and have fun with it.I suggest a language program with teacher:group interaction. The program should consist of phonemic awareness; basic grammatic?structures; meaningful conversational situations to improve comprehension and vocabulary that will be apply to your travel experience and connection with the culture.

In addition, you may want to take advantage of the media and the Internet. Listen to a radio station; read the newspapers or magazines on topics of interest?with prior knowledge and watch Spanish movies or a novela (most come from Venezuela and Mexico).? Most important, take advantage of Spanish speaking?dancers at the milongas and talk to them in Spanish. It will might just make you laugh on the dance floor!

Felicidades en el Ano Nuevo!

Angela Maria
NYC






Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 16:45:31 -0500
From: Angela Maria <angelaml38@aol.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish


Saludos!
Why does my post have all those irrelevant question marks all over the place?
This is the second time that it occurs to me and would like to know what am I doing wrong? Is there a specific program for one to use to avoid this problem?

Gracias,

Angela Maria
NYC







Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 01:23:41 GMT
From: "larrynla@juno.com" <larrynla@juno.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: tango-L@mit.edu

Perhaps the most noticeable and easiest adjusted-to difference of north
Argentine Spanish is how y and ll (which sound to English speakers like
the y in yes) are pronounced. It sounds like zh (the French j). This is
what you hear on the radio and TV and movies. But in Buenos Aires the
zh sound often becomes sh.

The singular you in many Spanish dialects is usted if formal, tu if
informal or familiar. In Rioplatense tu is replaced by vos. The verb-
form used with vos is different than in most other Spanish dialects,
but don't ask me how. I'm still struggling with verb forms in general.

Some commonly used nouns are different in Argentina, but you simply
have to get used to hearing them. There are too many to list and
memorize.

If you speak another variety of Spanish you may notice that the flow of
northern (Rioplatense) Spanish is different. It was heavily influenced
by southern Italian immigrants.

Another complication to getting along in Spanish in Argentina is that
there are a lot of immigrants, especially from nearby neighbors.


Larry de Los Angeles
http://ShapechangerTales.com - website of the Immortal Shapechanger
series




Save $15 on Flowers and Gifts from FTD!
Shop now at http://offers.juno.com/TGL1131/?u=http://www.ftd.com/17007">www.ftd.com/17007">http://offers.juno.com/TGL1131/?u=http://www.ftd.com/17007






Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 10:38:45 -0700
From: "Huck Kennedy" <tempehuck@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: tango-l@mit.edu
<ecf43f370901020938p73e4f918ofbf67bc7f2b5ff68@mail.gmail.com>

On Thu, Jan 1, 2009 at 6:23 PM, larrynla@juno.com <larrynla@juno.com> wrote:

>
> The singular you in many Spanish dialects is usted if formal, tu if
> informal or familiar. In Rioplatense tu is replaced by vos. The verb-
> form used with vos is different than in most other Spanish dialects,
> but don't ask me how. I'm still struggling with verb forms in general.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voseo appears to be a fairly
comprehensive report, best one I've seen so far on the internet.

The article mostly assumes the reader is already aware that a
second person plural form vosotros can still be found in Spain (most
countries just use ustedes for both formal and familar). The
conjugations for the singular vos are a takeoff (with several
variations) on the vosotros form.

At the end of the article, they claim Costa Rica uses vos. I've
spent a lot of time on the southwest coast, and a few days in San Jose
as well, and I never heard it in either place. What I did hear a lot
of was using usted for the familiar, even amongst family members,
which I found to be quite odd.

Huck





Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 12:48:33 -0800
From: "Erika Hilliard" <hilliard@shaw.ca>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Spanish
To: <larrynla@juno.com>, <tango-L@mit.edu>

Perhaps someone has already mentioned this and I missed it, but a great
interactive web site for learning Spanish (and any number of other
languages) is www.livemocha.com. It's amazing that it's free. It contains
learning, reviewing, reading and writing exercises complete with colorful
photos depicting the meaning of the words or sentences. A network of
language-learning pals from all over the world correct your writing and your
pronunciation. You return the favor by correcting short compositions written
in your native language. Another site is www.mangolanguages.com. However, I
had trouble getting beyond the first sample lesson.
Hope you enjoy livemocha as much as I do. Erika

-----Original Message-----



Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2009 5:24 PM
To: tango-L@mit.edu
Subject: [Tango-L] Spanish

Perhaps the most noticeable and easiest adjusted-to difference of north
Argentine Spanish is how y and ll (which sound to English speakers like
the y in yes) are pronounced. It sounds like zh (the French j). This is
what you hear on the radio and TV and movies. But in Buenos Aires the
zh sound often becomes sh.

The singular you in many Spanish dialects is usted if formal, tu if
informal or familiar. In Rioplatense tu is replaced by vos. The verb-
form used with vos is different than in most other Spanish dialects,
but don't ask me how. I'm still struggling with verb forms in general.

Some commonly used nouns are different in Argentina, but you simply
have to get used to hearing them. There are too many to list and
memorize.

If you speak another variety of Spanish you may notice that the flow of
northern (Rioplatense) Spanish is different. It was heavily influenced
by southern Italian immigrants.

Another complication to getting along in Spanish in Argentina is that
there are a lot of immigrants, especially from nearby neighbors.


Larry de Los Angeles
http://ShapechangerTales.com - website of the Immortal Shapechanger
series




Save $15 on Flowers and Gifts from FTD!
Shop now at http://offers.juno.com/TGL1131/?u=http://www.ftd.com/17007">www.ftd.com/17007">http://offers.juno.com/TGL1131/?u=http://www.ftd.com/17007






Continue to Pablo Veron ? | ARTICLE INDEX