350  Evora & other nontraditional tango

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Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001 09:54:33 -0500
From: Robinne Gray <rlg2@CORNELL.EDU>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

>I was wondering if anyone out here has danced to this song & what there
>experience was? The last time I requested it here locally I was met with a
>look of alarm from the DJ.

I didn't mind this song when it was first played, but it has come to
annoy me from too much exposure. A little of it goes a long way, because
it's very repetitive, like a little wind-up music box that plays only one
verse. What puzzles me more is why only this one non-tango song has met
with dancers' approval as a "crossover hit." Surely there are others that
would be appropriate and danceable, and then we wouldn't have to hear Evora
ad nauseum (especially since there are three versions in circulation).

I have a personal favorite in the nontraditional category: a tune
called "Las Golondrinas" by Tejano singer Tish Hinojosa, adapted from a
poem. It's not tango, but the tone of the song fits well in the tango
paradigm--it's a haunting melody with lyrics about lost youth and overtones
of the divine, and a beautiful (if brief) violin solo that might even
delight the purists. Maybe I'll post the words in the next day or so. You
can hear 30 seconds of it on CDnow.com by doing an artist search; it's on
the "Frontejas" album.

~Robinne
Ithaca, NY




Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001 08:44:11 -0700
From: Brian Dunn <brianpdunn@EARTHLINK.NET>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

Re: "Tango to Evora" (L. McKennitt):

>>I was wondering if anyone out here has danced to this song & what there
>>experience was? The last time I requested it here locally I was met with a
>>look of alarm from the DJ.

>>>

I didn't mind this song when it was first played, but it has come to
annoy me from too much exposure...What puzzles me more is why only this one
non-tango song has met
with dancers' approval as a "crossover hit." Surely there are others that
would be appropriate and danceable...
<<<
I think that, in addition to being beautiful, the fact that the title
contains the word "Tango" led many people to try dancing to it that wouldn't
otherwise have thought of it. Around here, Bob Telson's "Gonzalo's Dream"
(from "Calling You" - out of print) and Eva Cassidy's "Wade in the Water"
(from "Songbird") enjoy a certain popularity because Daniel Trenner used
them for performances and in his workshops in Denver and Boulder.

>>>

I have a personal favorite in the nontraditional category: a tune
called "Las Golondrinas" by Tejano singer Tish Hinojosa, adapted from a
poem.
<<<
Interesting, especially the fairly prominent (albeit very slow) milonga
rhythm...thanks for the recommendation. Anyone else have any nominees?

Brian Dunn
Boulder, Colorado USA
www.danceoftheheart.com




Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001 11:43:34 -0900
From: Dan Boccia <redfox@ALASKA.NET>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

Hi everyone -

I'm glad Robinne spoke up and told us that she feels this song gets
overplayed. I feel the same - it has all but lost its luster for me, which
is sad, because the Greek version of this song is really something special
to dance to. As far as other non-tango music that translates the feel of
tango, I don't even know where to begin. There is music from several
countries that fit this category, and many different genres of music. Some,
I feel, are equal to or more compelling than Tango to Evora. They all have
a different mood, which fits different situations. I enjoy exploring the
record stores for this music. Also, don't overlook the tango genre itself
for non-traditional music that may fit the mood of a certain milonga - every
once in a *rare* while, one of those passionate, overblown vocals can sound
really great, for instance.

I agree with Tom that there is so much tango to choose from that I often
don't even think of the non-tangos. The other reason is that the non-tangos
are "specialty" music, and I'd prefer to hear these songs on rare occasion,
and hopefully not the same song every time I hear a non-tango.

I typically don't hear these non-tangos until the wee hours of the morning,
after several hours of dancing. At this point, I may still be interested in
dancing, but it's so much easier to interpret the classic dance tangos at
this late hour. I'd rather hear a non-tango or two (at the most) somewhere
toward the height of the evening, when everyone is dancing well, energized,
and more able to interpret an unfamiliar song from another genre of music.
Those who don't want to dance can sit one or two songs out, socialize, and
have confidence (hopefully) that the DJ will go back to solid tango dance
music after 1-2 songs, and everyone can enjoy the experience. This could
take the place of the salsa, chacarera, or swing set, perhaps. But at 2 or
3am, I tend to crave the really classic stuff from Tanturi, D'Agostino,
D'Arienzo, Troilo, etc. that have very compelling dance rhythms. The
classic tangos, written by the great dance bands, pull me onto the floor
regardless of how tired I am.

My hat is off to the DJs who keep the dancers in their own towns dancing
every single week with good solid dance music.

Dan Boccia
Anchorage, AK




Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001 22:02:35 +0100
From: "Kohlhaas, Bernhard" <bernhard.kohlhaas@SAP.COM>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

Another song that reminds me of tango (or rather of a slow milonga) is "A
Andorinha Da Primavera" by the Portugese group "Madredeus". It's on their
album "O Paraiso" (and a live version of it on "O Porto").

There is a soundclip on cdnow.com at

http://www.cdnow.com/cgi-bin/mserver/SID60603144/pagename=/RP/CDN/FIND/alb
um.html/artistid=MADREDEUS/itemidF9528

Best regards,
Bernhard


-----Original Message-----



From: Brian Dunn [mailto:brianpdunn@earthlink.net]
Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2001 7:44 AM
To: TANGO-L@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango


Re: "Tango to Evora" (L. McKennitt):

>>I was wondering if anyone out here has danced to this song & what there
>>experience was? The last time I requested it here locally I was met with a
>>look of alarm from the DJ.

>>>

I didn't mind this song when it was first played, but it has come to
annoy me from too much exposure...What puzzles me more is why only this one
non-tango song has met
with dancers' approval as a "crossover hit." Surely there are others that
would be appropriate and danceable...
<<<
I think that, in addition to being beautiful, the fact that the title
contains the word "Tango" led many people to try dancing to it that wouldn't
otherwise have thought of it. Around here, Bob Telson's "Gonzalo's Dream"
(from "Calling You" - out of print) and Eva Cassidy's "Wade in the Water"
(from "Songbird") enjoy a certain popularity because Daniel Trenner used
them for performances and in his workshops in Denver and Boulder.

>>>

I have a personal favorite in the nontraditional category: a tune
called "Las Golondrinas" by Tejano singer Tish Hinojosa, adapted from a
poem.
<<<
Interesting, especially the fairly prominent (albeit very slow) milonga
rhythm...thanks for the recommendation. Anyone else have any nominees?

Brian Dunn
Boulder, Colorado USA
www.danceoftheheart.com




Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001 15:49:39 -0600
From: Stephen Brown <Stephen.P.Brown@DAL.FRB.ORG>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

Some non-traditional music that I like for tango dancing:

Farolito (a waltz) and Poquito Fe (a bolero, I think), from the same Tish
Hinojosa CD, Frontejas, that Robbine mentioned.

Grace Jones' recording of Libertango (which certainly isn't traditional),
and no longer available.

Le Tango de Roxanne from the soundtrack of Moulin Rouge, which integrates
the song Roxanne with a tango.

I agree with the sentiments expressed by Tom, Robinne and Dan that the use
of novelty recordings can be fun as added spice during the evening, but
that a DJ should use a considerable amount of judgement when using them.

Looking at non-tangos for dancing, certainly seems to recommend the
advantages of modern tango recordings. They have great fidelity and used
sparingly, they can be quite fun, particularly if one is willing to accept
the dancers engaging in a little theatrics. Played more than sparingly,
however, modern tango recordings sound repititous because most come from
the same progressive Pugliese/Piazzolla/Salgan concert sensibility.

The Daniel Barenboim CD, Tangos Among Friends, is a little bit different
way to go modern. The playing on Barenboim's CD is somewhat rubato, but is
not quite as progressive, has fewer tempo changes, and many of the tracks
might be suitable for late night dancing.

With best regards,
Steve

By the way, the second disc of the two DVD set for Moulin Rouge that was
released yesterday contains a full uncut version of the tango dance number.
You can watch it from any of the four camera angles...




Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 01:57:52 -0600
From: Bibib Wong <bibibwong@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Evora & other nontraditional tango

I am such an ignorant newbie, after these postings, I went to look for Evora
and realized I have heard it before and LOVED IT!

Mr. Brown felt that modern non-tango requires dancers to "engag(e)in a
little theatrics", but for Evora, I however beg to differ in opinion. The
rhythm for that piece is very straight forward, with ritards-- if any--
being faithfully contained in each phrase. The musical touch is steadily
controlled at simmer point through out. In contrast, there are a lot of
tango music with more drastric range of tempo and mood that almost demand
theatrics.

I have another nomination: album "Romanza", Time to Say Good by Andrea
Bocelli and Sarah Brightman.
http://www.cdnow.com/cgi-bin/mserver/SIDÉ7664369/pagename=/RP/CDN/FIND/album.html/ITEMIDD2494

while "Le tue Parole" from the same album is good for rhumba.

Bibi (Chicago)







Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 09:37:25 +0100
From: Hannes Rieger <hrieger@GMX.DE>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

Brian Dunn wrote:

> Interesting, especially the fairly prominent (albeit very slow) milonga
> rhythm...thanks for the recommendation. Anyone else have any nominees?


IMHO many nontraditional valses are suited for dancing tango vals.
I have huge success with Waltz #2 from Jazzsuite by
Dmitri Schostakowitsch, performed by Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.
The dancers really love it, so I have to play it on every milonga.
Maybe you know the vals from the movie 'Eyes Wide Shot'
(Stanley Kubrick, 1999).

Greetings from Germany,
Hannes




Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 09:27:01 -0500
From: Khaled El-Hage <khaled.elhage@SYMPATICO.CA>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

Brian Dunn wrote

> Interesting, especially the fairly prominent (albeit very slow) milonga
> rhythm...thanks for the recommendation. Anyone else have any nominees?

Two of my favourites are gypsy waltzes played by "Romane" on his album "Impair &
valse". The titles are "Montagne Sainte Genevieve" and "La Valse des Niglos".
Romane plays the guitar in the same style as Django Reinhart. These are pretty
fast waltzes and contrary to some traditional waltzes where all three beats are
emphasised equally, the emphasis here is on the first beat as in tango waltz.

Happy holidays to you all.

khaled.




Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 09:41:23 -0600
From: Stephen Brown <Stephen.P.Brown@DAL.FRB.ORG>
Subject: Re: Evora & other nontraditional tango

Bibib Wong wrote:

>Mr. Brown felt that modern non-tango requires dancers to "engag(e)in a
>little theatrics"

My writing may been a little unclear In fact, that is not what I intended
to communicate.

What I meant was to that the use non-tango recordings makes a case for
using modern tango recordings. The modern tango recordings have great
fidelity and used sparingly, they can be quite fun, particularly if one is
willing to accept the dancers engaging in a little theatrics.

With best regards,
Steve




Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 20:42:59 +0000
From: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Traditional Tango
To: Tango-L List <tango-l@mit.edu>


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roNnIkrkfAY

Mario sent this example of tango dancing, some people think that what is shown has something of "NUevo Tango".

This is the most traditional tango salon that you can see. The tango as danced and taught in the 40s. and today by the most famous tango teachers such as
Nito and Elba, Osvaldo Zotto, Carlos Copello, Mingo Pugliese, Puppy Costello, Diego Di Falco, etc, etc.

Used as it should be in close and open embrace as needed. Exhibiting, diffeent fforms of walking, some ornaments, amagues, boleos, enrosques, rulos, sacadas, right walked turns with sacadas, ets.

In my opinion this is the root of tango, as it has all the movements of tango, the other styles have adopted some of the moves of traditional tango to adapt to certain conditions or to achieve certain effects.

It is the style as danced in "Villa Urquiza" and called by that name by some.

It has absolutely nothing of Nuevo Tango, on the other hand Nuevo Tango has borrowed selectively certain movements of traditonal Salon Tango.

Best regards, Sergio
Stay up to date on your PC, the Web, and your mobile phone with Windows Live
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Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 15:58:46 -0700
From: Tom Stermitz <stermitz@tango.org>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Traditional Tango
To: Tango-L <tango-l@mit.edu>


On Nov 12, 2008, at 1:42 PM, Sergio Vandekier wrote:

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roNnIkrkfAY
>
> Mario sent this example of tango dancing, some people think that
> what is shown has something of "NUevo Tango".
>
> This is the most traditional tango salon that you can see. The
> tango as danced and taught in the 40s. and today by the most famous
> tango teachers such as
> ....
> It is the style as danced in "Villa Urquiza" and called by that name
> by some.


In the video, what specifically makes this style Villa Urquiza, as
opposed to some other style.

Tom Stermitz
Denver, CO 80207







Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 00:03:43 -0600
From: Barbara Garvey <barbara@tangobar-productions.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Traditional Tango
To: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@hotmail.com>
Cc: Tango-L List <tango-l@mit.edu>


Amen! This is what was thought of as the best salon (social) tango and
taught exclusively as such prior to 1994. This is what today's younger
(and older!) tango stars learned to dance in the milongas, before
expanding the vocabulary for exibition. Believe me it can be, and was,
done on crowded floors, in line of dance. Nuevo tango used this style
for analysis to go beyond into a new variety of exhibition tango.
Barbara

Sergio Vandekier wrote:

>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roNnIkrkfAY
>
>Mario sent this example of tango dancing, some people think that what is shown has something of "NUevo Tango".
>
>This is the most traditional tango salon that you can see. The tango as danced and taught in the 40s. and today by the most famous tango teachers such as
>Nito and Elba, Osvaldo Zotto, Carlos Copello, Mingo Pugliese, Puppy Costello, Diego Di Falco, etc, etc.
>
> Used as it should be in close and open embrace as needed. Exhibiting, diffeent fforms of walking, some ornaments, amagues, boleos, enrosques, rulos, sacadas, right walked turns with sacadas, ets.
>
>In my opinion this is the root of tango, as it has all the movements of tango, the other styles have adopted some of the moves of traditional tango to adapt to certain conditions or to achieve certain effects.
>
>It is the style as danced in "Villa Urquiza" and called by that name by some.
>
>It has absolutely nothing of Nuevo Tango, on the other hand Nuevo Tango has borrowed selectively certain movements of traditonal Salon Tango.
>
>Best regards, Sergio
>Stay up to date on your PC, the Web, and your mobile phone with Windows Live
>http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/119462413/direct/01/
>
>
>
>
>No virus found in this incoming message.
>Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
>Version: 8.0.175 / Virus Database: 270.9.2/1783 - Release Date: 11/12/2008 10:01 AM
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>




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