6149  The Guided Practica

ARTICLE INDEX


Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 09:48:26 -0800 (PST)
From: Mario <sopelote@yahoo.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] The Guided Practica
To: tango-l@mit.edu

I attended a guided practica in Phila. and thought it a great way to experience
the dance and dance instruction all at the same time.
The instructor was Sridhar of Tangohug dot com.
In my experience, I am not in the mood to attend a full Practica nor Milonga
after an energetic 1 1/2 hour class. So, it's usually one or the other.
This way, I got to experience the dance in it's total reality and had the
added opportunity to get feedback on my form, musicality, etc.
At times, Sridhar would come over to us after a song and a little aside
from the line of dance, show a way to improve our dance. Even when this
happened in the line of dance, the other dancers had no qualms about
simply navigating around the knot of instruction and going on with their
own dance. I've heard that this will be done again in the future and I'm
enthusiasticly looking forward to it!
I was wondering if anyone in this forum could comment on similar experiences
and maybe tell us something about the proceedures used at their's.
..all comments welcome







Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 11:27:49 -0800
From: meaning of life <kushi_bushi@hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] The Guided Practica
To: <sopelote@yahoo.com>, tango list <tango-l@mit.edu>


i call these "practilongas", and think that they are a blast. i actually usually prefer them to milongas, because they are a bit more "easy going".

in our area, they are great and we always have alot of fun. the better dancers are really great about "tuning up" everyone who wants to be helped out.

dans on
The TangonistaSponsered by P.E.T.A. (People Expressing Tango Attitude)NOTICE - no cats were injured in the making of our music> Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 09:48:26 -0800> From: sopelote@yahoo.com> To: tango-l@mit.edu> Subject: [Tango-L] The Guided Practica> > I attended a guided practica in Phila. and thought it a great way to experience> the dance and dance instruction all at the same time.> The instructor was Sridhar of Tangohug dot com.> In my experience, I am not in the mood to attend a full Practica nor Milonga> after an energetic 1 1/2 hour class. So, it's usually one or the other.> This way, I got to experience the dance in it's total reality and had the> added opportunity to get feedback on my form, musicality, etc.> At times, Sridhar would come over to us after a song and a little aside> from the line of dance, show a way to improve our dance. Even when this> happened in the line of dance, the other dancers had no qualms about> simply navigating around the knot of instr!
Stay up to date on your PC, the Web, and your mobile phone with Windows Live
http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/119462413/direct/01/




Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 11:30:05 -0800 (PST)
From: "Trini y Sean (PATangoS)" <patangos@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] The Guided Practica
To: tango-l@mit.edu

--- On Mon, 11/10/08, Mario <sopelote@yahoo.com> wrote:

> I was wondering if anyone in this forum could comment on
> similar experiences and maybe tell us something about the proceedures used at their's. ..all comments welcome


For the past 6 years we've had a real practica, not a "practilonga", on a day separate from class day. It's become a model for the other 2 practicas in town. We make the point that it is a working practica to encourage the separation between work and play. We want milongas to be all play, so we've set a completely different tone for practicas. Anyone at our practica comes prepared for constructive feedback.

We are fortunate to use a spacious, professional dance studio with walls of mirrors, barres, beautiful wooden floors, and a built-in sound system. As you enter, you will commonly find people simply walking around the room, sometimes in socks. Along the short wall of mirrors is where people can do their ochos or molinete exercises. There is a ronda, but those who are working on something specific usually find a spot in the middle. When they are ready to actually dance, they join in the ronda.

Only good music is played and may or may not be in tandas. I try to use different music at the practica than I do for a milonga. Because it is a practica, I tend to use a little more Rodriguez or Canaro and less Troilo so participants can concentrate more on body mechanics. Music is adjusted as needed. If a workshop on milonga was just held, for example, I'll announce a straight half-hour of milonga music, so people can practice the material fully.

As for as teaching goes, Sean and I approach people, as do two other teachers. Beginning students get their turn first. I may not work with them personally, but I watch to make sure that they get attention from one of us teachers. Novices also come a lot and we'll teach them the basic walk and embrace. For intermediates and above, I usually let them do their own thing, unless I see something glaring or if they've asked me something. I only have time to check on them once every few weeks.

When I do work with someone, I try to spend at least 15 minutes of quality time with them. Sometimes it takes half-an-hour. I trust my more experienced students to help with the new students. And eventually, those new students will become the experienced students, and so forth. On occasion I'll stop the music and address everyone about a particular problem or issue. When the music ends, I'll make any announcements of up coming events.

For me practicas are important in knowing what's happening in the community, moreso than the milongas. Because it's at the practicas where people are freer to talk, make mistakes, and ask questions. No excuses necessary.

Trini de Pittsburgh








Continue to My dream....(another song) | ARTICLE INDEX