6237  Pity the poor Milonguru

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Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2009 23:02:47 GMT
From: "larrynla@juno.com" <larrynla@juno.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Pity the poor Milonguru
To: tango-L@mit.edu

A while back I chatted with a frequent partner at a milonga. She had
just gotten back from her second trip to Buenos Aires and she was
disillusioned. "Milongueros are just fat little old greasy men who
want to grab my ass!"

Being Very Very Wise I refrained from saying I thought her ass was a
fine example of natural art and that I would love to grab it too. Come
to think of it, the rest of her is quite lovely. Maybe that was the
source of her disillusion. I've heard that milongueros go from senior
statesmen to old goats very fast in the presence of a beautiful woman.
After all, they're only human.

The "only human" theme came up again just a couple of weeks ago on the
phone while talking to an occasional tango partner. She had spent the
entire summer in Buenos Aires and thought that a great time to go
there. It is their winter, but BsAs winters are not unpleasant,
especially when you spend a lot of time in milongas which never use air
conditioning.

"After a few weeks they got to know me and I started getting to dance
with dancers who friends there told me were some of the top
milongueros," she said or something close to that. "Their dancing was
so smooth and their leads so great I didn't have to worry about getting
bumped or guessing what he wanted me to do and they really knew the
music."

But eventually, she said, it got boring. They were a little too good,
a statement that puzzled me and does still. When I tried to get some
details that would clear up the issue she could not put her finger on
the problem beyond saying she expected more, somehow, from milongueros.

"Were they just a bunch of old guys?" I asked. No, a few of them were
younger, a couple really good looking, maybe professional dancers.

Could it be that we non-Argentines have so exalted the abilities of
milongurus of both sexes that anything short of magical abilities
will disappoint us?


Larry de Los Angeles
http://ShapechangerTales.com - Immortal Shapechanger series web site
short story "The Forest Demon" added



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Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2009 23:49:18 +0000
From: Jay Rabe <jayrabe@hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Pity the poor Milonguru
To: "tango-l@mit.edu" <tango-l@mit.edu>


My guess is that the skill level of US dancers has just improved so much over the last few years of tango obsession that the bar is raised a bit. At least I'd like to think that's the case.

J



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Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2009 16:23:50 -0800 (PST)
From: NANCY <ningle_2000@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Pity the poor Milonguru
To: Jay Rabe <jayrabe@hotmail.com>, "tango-l@mit.edu"
<tango-l@mit.edu>

What you need to remember, too, is that all those
milongueros are getting older every day. I notice
that the guys who were such dreamy dancers eight
years ago have deteriorated in balance, hearing,
eyesight and movement of joints. And yes, for sure,
as we dance with better trained dancers at various
festivals, we come to expect better dancing even from
The Legends. I consistently get better dances at
major US Festivals than I do in my annual visits to
BsAs. And the guys in the US are not hustling lessons
or taxi dancer services as too many of the milongueros
are doing these days.


--- Jay Rabe <jayrabe@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
> My guess is that the skill level of US dancers has
> just improved so much over the last few years of
> tango obsession that the bar is raised a bit. At
> least I'd like to think that's the case.
>
> J
>
>
>
>
> Windows Live?: E-mail. Chat. Share. Get more ways to
> connect.
>

http://windowslive.com/online/hotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_AE_Faster_022009

>









Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2009 10:25:45 +0000
From: Donald Sinclair <donald.sinclair@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Pity the poor Milonguru
To: tango-L@mit.edu
<69c128920902060225t4063822dkc3bfcce323c6a655@mail.gmail.com>

On Thu, Feb 5, 2009 at 11:02 PM, larrynla@juno.com <larrynla@juno.com> wrote:

>
> But eventually, she said, it got boring. They were a little too good,
> a statement that puzzled me and does still. When I tried to get some
> details that would clear up the issue she could not put her finger on
> the problem beyond saying she expected more, somehow, from milongueros.

My guess:
They are giving her exactly what they think she wants - so "her body
can follow, and her spirit can dance".
If she wants more (playfulness? fire?) out of them, she has to express that.
A good dancer will pick up on what their partner shows, and reflect
it, amplified, with their own interpretation,
in a virtuous circle.
Perhaps she has forgotten that women rule the world (so they get to
follow - a much more immersive experience), and part of being a
follower is building the leaders up towards what you want them to be.

Donald





Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2009 13:07:42 -0800 (PST)
From: Jack Dylan <jackdylan007@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Pity the poor Milonguru
To: tango-L@mit.edu

I was sitting in Nino Bien the other night, opposite my partner as we
sipped our Chandon, probaby looking like a couple of newbie tourists.
I've been before but not for a couple of years. Anyway, an?old guy walked
behind my partner, put his hand on one of her bare shoulders and stroked
her neck as his hand passed to her other shoulder. He smiled as he walked
on. I was also smiling as?I asked who he was, assuming?she knew him.
She had no idea who he was. Is this 'normal' behaviour?in Buenos Aires?
I've been in places where it's likely to result in?trouble, to put it mildly.

Jack



> From: "larrynla@juno.com" <larrynla@juno.com>
>
> A while back I chatted with a frequent partner at a milonga..? She had
> just gotten back from her second trip to Buenos Aires and she was
> disillusioned.? "Milongueros are just fat little old greasy men who
> want to grab my ass!"
>
> Being Very Very Wise I refrained from saying I thought her ass was a
> fine example of natural art and that I would love to grab it too.? Come
> to think of it, the rest of her is quite lovely.? Maybe that was the
> source of her disillusion.? I've heard that milongueros go from senior
> statesmen to old goats very fast in the presence of a beautiful woman.?
> After all, they're only human.
>













Date: Sat, 07 Feb 2009 16:52:06 -0200
From: Shahrukh Merchant <shahrukh@shahrukhmerchant.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] Pity the poor Milonguru/Ni?o Bien
To: tango-l@mit.edu

Jack Dylan <jackdylan007@yahoo.com> wrote:

> I was sitting in Nino Bien the other night, opposite my partner as we
> sipped our Chandon, probaby looking like a couple of newbie tourists.

Hey, next time stop by and say hello :-) (I was there too, after several
months). But skip the overpriced Chandon--Nieto Senetiner is much better.

A word on Ni?o Bien: It has changed a lot in its "aura," as has most of
the other milongas that now have a high tourist attendance (I would
estimate over 50% last Thursday). However, within the set of milongas
popular with tourists, it's still a personal favourite since:

- Their prices have not risen unreasonably. And with the apparently
still little-known and not advertised policy that the admission ticket
is valid for a free water or soft drink (or a glass of house wine or
champagne too, I believe), it's almost a bargain.

- They still help you find a seat and seat you (though this breaks down
when it is really full--they'll still admit you without saying there is
no space and then ...???).

- Shows are rare. (This is a good thing as far as I'm concerned--90% of
such shows I find boring and emotionless, though the vast majority of
the crowd, including the Argentines, seem to love them.)

- I usually run into people I know even though I've ceased to be an habitu?.

> an old guy walked
> behind my partner, put his hand on one of her bare shoulders and stroked
> her neck as his hand passed to her other shoulder. ...
> She had no idea who he was. Is this 'normal' behaviour in Buenos Aires?
> I've been in places where it's likely to result in trouble, to put it mildly.

No, it's not normal, nor considered appropriate, but also not likely to
result in "trouble to put it mildly" for the perpetrator. Between Latin
machismo, generally more comfort with physical contact, the fact that it
was at a milonga and could be passed off as a perhaps-too-affectionate
invitation to dance, etc., a frown and/or "That was weird," perhaps a
dirty look at the old guy in question, is about the level of objection
one is likely to see to that. However, I don't really see this happening
all that often off the dance floor (from reports I hear, the dirty old
men seem to wait until they have their victims firmly in their clutches
ON the dance floor...).

Shahrukh



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