372  Roberto Firpo - Julio De Caro

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Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 23:29:15 -0800
From: Sergio <cachafaz@ADELPHIA.NET>
Subject: Roberto Firpo - Julio De Caro

Some clarification with respect to the following comment I just received.

>"Firpo, an evolutionist??? I can't imagine that classification of Firpo,

in
fact I would think just the opposite. Perhaps Julio De Caro would be a
better example of the early evolutionist, yes?"<.

Roberto Firpo (1884-1969) as director, composer and interpreter was one of
the first 'Evolutionists' that tango had.
He introduced and firmly established piano as part of the tango orchestra.
He was an exquisite pianist specially remembered for his soloist
interpretations and the liberal use of pedal to acquire great resonance.
As composer he introduced a romantic air that had never been present before
in those tangos created for the dancer's feet.

Here some of his great compositions: Sentimiento Criollo, De pura Cepa,
Marejada. Also Fuegos Artificiales together with Arolas,
Didi, El Amanecer (first example of descriptive music in tango)...and many
others. He also liked Vals with passion and composed many of them with great
success during his time: Palida Sombra, Horizonte Azul, Noche Calurosa (one
of my favorites), Ondas Sonoras, Noches de frio and many others.

Evolutionist then is used here to signify a change, an evolution, a
different approach to the elements that had existed before.
This movement developed creating music quite different from the original
one.

Julio De Caro was born on December 11 1899 . The Day of Tango as on December
11 was also born Carlos Gardel.
Both were predestined to change tango one as Tango Cancion (singer) the
other as an instrumental interpreter.(violinist).

Julio's first music teacher was his father who was opposed to tango.
Secretly as a teenager Julio went to Palais de glace where he met Roberto
Firpo; the famous pianist invited the youth to come on stage and play with
his orchestra. To Firpos' surprise the boy played three different
'contracantos' each time that the first part of the Cumparsita was being
played. It was fate that sitting in one of the tables was Eduardo Arolas who
immediately invited Julio to join his quartet. These escapades caused that
his father finally expelled him from his house.

He is considered an Evolutionist because he introduced "arrangements",
"instrumental solos" influence from jazz and "variations". He gave a great
protagonist place to the piano that followed the melody with harmonies and
not only with rhythm as it had been done till then. He also changed the way
the bandoneon played, this influenced all the bandoneon players that
followed including Piazzolla.
It was this particular way of interpreting that ended the Guardia Vieja and
originated the Guardia Nueva. He even used a horn amplifier for his violin.
He died March 10 1988 but left his tangos: Tierra Querida, Boedo, Orgullo
Criollo, Mala Junta, El monito, Moulin Rouge,
y many others...

In summary both Roberto Firpo and Julio De Caro are "Evolutionists". De
Caro is more frequently mentioned as a typical representative of this
current.

bibliography Magazine Tango Nuestro. (special edition Diario Popular).





To: TANGO-L @MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Roberto Firpo - Julio De Caro



Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 22:24:52 +0000
From: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Firpo - De Caro

To: TANGO-L @MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Roberto Firpo - Julio De Caro



Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2008 13:59:06 -0800
From: flame@2xtreme.net
Subject: [Tango-L] From: Mario Re: Firpo
To: tango-l@mit.edu

This video was shot at the Escuela Argentina de Tango at the Galerias
Pacifico in El Centro where Firpo teaches. He's demonstrating the power of
pausing (probably after a class with that theme) with what looks like a
student from the class.
I was fortunate to have taken classes from Firpo there. He's a great dancer
and teacher!





Date: Wed, 5 Nov 2008 20:04:43 -0800 (PST)
From: Jack Dylan <jackdylan007@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Tango-L] From: Mario Re: Firpo
To: flame@2xtreme.net, tango-l@mit.edu

I've also taken classes with Jorge Firpo and, while he's very good and
a lot of fun, it's a huge stretch to classify him as 'a?great dancer and
teacher'.

For my taste, he over-emphasises the importance of embellishments
for both man and lady.

I prefer to keep things more simple and elegant. But I'd certainly go
back to his classes. His ex-wife Aurora Lubiz is also excellent and
teaches at the same school. I would also add that Escuela Argentina
de Tango is a great school in general for anyone looking for group
classes. Lots of high-quality teachers at 3 different locations around
the city. And continuous classes daily from around mid-day to 10.00pm.
?
Jack, HK



----- Original Message ----

> From: "flame@2xtreme.net" <flame@2xtreme.net>
> To: tango-l@mit.edu
> Sent: Thursday, November 6, 2008 5:59:06 AM
> Subject: [Tango-L] From: Mario Re: Firpo
>
> This video was shot at the Escuela Argentina de Tango at the Galerias
> Pacifico in El Centro where Firpo teaches. He's demonstrating the power of
> pausing (probably after a class with that theme) with what looks like a
> student from the class.
> I was fortunate to have taken classes from Firpo there. He's a great dancer
> and teacher!










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