234  Thoughts

ARTICLE INDEX


Date: Tue, 18 Sep 2001 20:30:32 EDT
From: Digest Polly McBride <ATANGO2@AOL.COM>
Subject: Thoughts

Let us dance through...

Our sorrow
Our losses
Our fears
Our differences
Ourselves

Through Dance we share

Treasured embraces
Comfort of a caring community
Strength in our unity
Gratitude for our blessings
Thoughts that bind us
Tears that blind us

Let us feel the magic of dance and each other.

Polly McBride
Portland, Oregon




Date: Sun, 26 May 2002 21:01:02 -0700
From: Trini or Sean - PATangoS <patangos@YAHOO.COM>
Subject: Sean's Thoughts on women asking men to dance

Suzanne Ryan wrote:
I might be a lone wolf howling in the wind but I personally think
this idea of women inviting men to dance is not a good one. I think
it
makes men passive and in some cases feeds egos that don't need any
more food...lol!

I have my own "Thoughts on women asking men to dance":

I am a lead who is often invited to dance by follows. I am sometimes
flattered, but more often annoyed, when women ask me to dance. There
is one local venue that I no longer attend, at least partially
because the follows are so predatory. I think it would help if women
were to adopt basic rules of etiquette when asking men to dance.
7 Learn to accept rejection graciously. (Men seem to have a lot more
practice in this area lol.) It is perfectly acceptable for the man
to say no thank you . If you get angry, or act like a spoiled brat,
there is a good chance that the man will avoid you from then on.
7 Learn to accept acceptance graciously. If the man accepts your
invitation, you are obliged to thank him when the tanda is finished.
If you act like you are entitled to dance with him, the man will feel
used and unappreciated, and may avoid you in the future.
7 It is fine to ask a lead to dance if he is talking or watching, but
not if he is moving purposely through the room. Don t ask someone who
is moving off of the floor, or toward another follow.
7 Don t ignore men who dance at your level, and invite only those
more skilled to dance. If a woman regularly asks me to dance, but
doesn t ask men at her level, I will tell her no .
7 Do sometimes ask men who are not quite up to your level. It is
very encouraging to them, and, as they become more skilled, you will
be a preferred partner. I had a very difficult time learning this
dance. For many years, most people considered me a basket case
(albeit a persistent one). A few experienced follows invited me to
dance, and gave me a great deal a help and encouragement. I now
dance with these women every chance that I get. They had to wait 5
years for me to be a decent lead, but each of them would tell you
that it was worth the wait.
7 Most importantly, at least once in a while, allow the man to choose
the partner that he wants to dance with. No one wants to be so
barraged with invitations that he feels he has no control over who he
dances with, and to which songs. Accept that an experienced lead is
going to have favorite songs, and he may have a different preferred
partner for each of those songs.

Sean from the 'Burgh


=====
PATangoS - Pittsburgh Argentine Tango Society . . .Our Mission: To make Argentine Tango Pittsburgh's most popular social dance.





Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 18:16:48 EDT
From: Stephen Chin-Bow <CHIN-BOW@SACC.HSCBKLYN.EDU>
Subject: Thoughts about Tango Fantasy 2002

Dear Tango-L,

It has been a while (more than a year) since my last post.

I attended the entire full Tango Fantasy 2002 program and I want to thank
Randy and Lydia for organizing such a fun event. Hosting the event at the
Fontainbleu Hotel is a great idea because the program feels like a VACATION.
I recommend the program in the future. The pool and the beach are wonderful.

Lydia and Randy made many good changes to the program, but for me, the best
change was to NOT hold workshops on Wednesday. Everyone was able to enjoy the
beach and sun (it was a cloudless day). We were all very rested for the
Wednesday evening milonga and the workshops on Thurs, Fri, and Sat. The total
number of workshops days was unchanged since in 2001 workshops were held on
Wednesday, but not on Saturday.

In a few days I will post my summary of the program at:
http://www.tangocentral.com/ustc

One of the more interesting moments I experienced during the week (and which
is described in the summary) is how, with the help of the hotel concierge, I
successfully repaired the only pair of dance shoes I had with me!

A week ago Nicole Dowell <bailadora2000@excite.com>, who I did not meet in
Florida, described taking a class where Diego diFalco and Carolina Zokalski
described dancing in the most crowded part of the floor. I also took a class
where Diego said something similar, but I forgot his exact words. My
interpretation is slightly different than Nicole's.

He encouraged leaders to challenge themselves (and to improve their navigation
skills) by dancing in parts of the dance floor where it may be crowded. He
was NOT saying to jump blindly into the frying pan. However, by GRADUALLY
challenging oneself to dance in more more and more crowded situations a leader
will gradually improve. If the leader is always "safe" the leader will not
know what to do when the leader finds himself in a situation which is new or
unexpected.

In NYC I do not enjoy dancing on an empty dance floor because I get "energy"
from the other dancers. Like Stephen Brown (who replied to one of Nicole's
messages) I get positive energy even when the floor is very crowded, provided
the other leaders near me do not do crazy stuff and the line of dance
progresses in a predictable way (even if the progression is very slow). If
the dance floor is very crowded and there are leaders who have little respect
for other couples then I feel the energy is negative (and I prefer to sit and
talk to friends).

Does anyone else feel this way?

I am not surprised the master teachers who taught at Tango Fantasy did not
dance a lot at the milongas with the students. What has not been stated in
other postings to the Tango-L is that the master teachers did NOT dance much
with with each other. They were all teaching 3-6 hours a day for seven days.
Plus they taught extra classes, privates, and they also had to rest for the
grand finale "Master's Show". They had to maintain their energy throughout
the week and they needed to avoid injuries.

I really like Facundo y Kely. Not only are very friendly people, but they are
also very "classy" people. At the milongas Facundo danced with many dancers
who took their workshops. I feel this is a very accurate statement because I
took many of their workshops and I recognized the women who Facundo danced
with from the workshops. Facundo also did this during Tango Fantasy 2001.

I also saw Diego diFalco dance occasionally with women from the classes he and
Carolina taught.

BTW, I am NOT "Tanguero Chino" (someone from NYC said he thought I was).

Ciao-

Stephen Chin-Bow

New York City's first internet tango calendar (and still the only calendar
which can be "personalized/customized"):

http://www.tangocentral.com/calendar

email: stephen@tangocentral.com




Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2002 22:59:29 EDT
From: Arthur Greenberg <AHGberg@AOL.COM>
Subject: Instructions to a Man/Leader in Tango (Thoughts of a Learner!)

Hi Listeros: Frank is the ficticious name of the
pupil/subject..............
Thoughts, observations & comments of my first ArgentineTango group lesson
I have not done any Tango before. Why am I here! I have got to learn a few
Tango moves so I can ask the chicks out onto the dance floor and get to know
them better!!!!!
I have observed a few couples dancing at a Milonga. I have attended one
milonga. It cost me ten dollars admission at the door. There seemed to be
more girls than men! I never got out onto the dance floor and I left soon,
being too embarassed to stay as a "non-dancing observer"!
I am now, for the first time, in attendance at a Group Tango Class. The
class is scheduled to start at 8 PM. It is now 10 minutes to start-time.
I have the flyer advertising the class in my pocket. It is in a seperate
pocket than my 20 dollar bill. I don't get paid till Friday and that is all I
have in the world between me and going hungry! And I still have to get some
gas for the car so I can get home! Sigh!

I await the start of the class while a few of the other waiting pupils
(couples) dance to the Tango music I hear playing. They seem (to me) to
look like they are dancing Tango. Although I have'nt a clue as to what they
are doing, I like what they are doing. When a couple returns to the
sidelines I introduce myself and engage them in conversation. I discover
that I am not as shy and introverted as I thougt myself to be!
When I ask them why they are here, they tell me that they are not beginners
but have been dancing for a year or two. They also tell me that they plan to
take lessons perpetually since there is such an immense amount of knowledge
that they must learn until they become intermediate/advanced Argentine
Tango dancers. They tell me that they plan to visit Buenos Aires, Argentina
to take Tango work shops and a vacation. I nervously feel for the twenty
dollars in my pocket. I have come directly from work and I am wearing the
clothes that I have been wearing all day. I remind myself that I need to
buy some gas for my car parked out in the lot so that I can get home
later, after the class. The teacher calls us all onto the dance floor and
has us form a circle without partners. He tells us that we will "work" in a
counter-clockwise formation. I am not sure but I think he referred to that
as the line of dance. He says that the first thing that we all have to
"work on"/learn is how to walk. I was a bit perplexed at this idea as I
have been walking for over thirty years, successfully getting where I wanted
to go! There is no music playing! Only the teacher imploring us to "reach
out" and to "maintain balance and control". I am not sure what he means but
I get in line anyway and for the next 5 to 10 minutes I am walking alone
(without a partner) just as everyone else was doing in a counter-clockwise
direction around the perimeter of the dance floor. We then are told to turn
around and walk backwards. Walk "naturally", I am told. I do not recall the
last time that I ever tried to walk backwards natrally or otherwise. Nothing
I am doing feels "natural"! I feel like an awkward misplaced person,
klunking around the dance floor! When will I start to learn how to dance??
The muscles in my legs are beginning to complain that they hurt! I thought
that I was in "good shape" but obviously I am not in as good shape as I
thought I was!
Next we are told to take a partner and assume a practice position facing
each other and holding each other at arms length as prescribed by the
teacher!. I am one of two men in attendance who do not have a female
partner. We are paired off with each other and I am now practicing the walk
with Ted, my man partner who seems to be very uncomfortable walking
backwards with me holding onto his shoulders. I too am somewhat
uncomfortable since I have never thought much about dancing with another man!
Just as I am about to have a mental breakdown the teacher gives the command
to change partners and a very attractive lady walks toward me to take the
"hold-the-shoulders-practice-position". I say, "Goodbye!" to Ted. Phew! I am
beginning to perspire and I am aware that I have been holding my breath
during most of the walking exercises.
The teacher must have known because he just reminded us all to be sure that
we breathed naturally rather than hold our breath!

I wonder if I am in the right place. I have the feeling that I am about to
get into something that is beyond my skill and with a learning schedule that
stretches into months and years. The twenty dollar bill in my pocket seems
to be safely there but is very lonely. The cost of the class is priced at
ten dollars per person. There seems to be more men than women who are in
attendance. I did not know the names of any one waiting for the class to
start. Most of the people I said, "Hello!" to, told me their names. They
seemed to be very sociable. Many of the people changed into their
special dance shoes that they brought with them in little shoe-bags. I was
not aware that I might require special dance shoes for the class. They
(the pupils) all seem to be dressed "well" excdept one guy who was wearing
shorts and white adidas basketball shoes. The teacher assured me that my
shoes were "adequate" for the amount of dancing I would be dong in his class.

Some couples are conversing in foreign languages. The Teacher is a
handsome Latino, along with his beautiful dance partner. I recognize them
from the picture on the advertising flyer. They seem to be in their late
twenties and very sophisticated.
The flyer pictures them in a Tango "dip", a very exotic pose, with her leg
draped over his while her thigh was exposed up to her silk black underwear!
I have not seen so much bare skin since I last went to the beach. The
flyer says, "Feel the Passion of the Tango!" Here I am, ready to feel the
passion of the Tango. First I have to learn to walk, I guess! When do I
start feeling the "passion"?

My thoughts return to Sylvia, the lady who is newly "my dance partner"! She
is very beautiful and although she seems to be much older (maybe ten years)
than myself I find her very pleasant. My thoughts of dancing with Ted a
minute ago are into history and I think how great it is to be dancing with
Sylvia.

The next thing we would learn would be the Tango Basic, an eight step
pattern that starts backward with my right foot proceeds aroound the side of
my partner brings m feet together and ends with a "walz basic resolution"!
After trying to accomplaish this I think that this pattern might have been
conceived on Mars or at least from outer space. The ladies were on the
opposite side of the room learning their "part" and I was told later that it
included a
"cruzada", something that I should lead but did not do during my 8 count
basic. Confusion prevailed in my already anxiety filled mind. We were
introduced to the dance hold which the teacher called, "an abrazo". The hour
of instruction ended on the note that I should practice what I was just
taught at the "practica" and to go home and listen to Tango music and
practice what I learned to my music at home!

As I turned out the lights and lay quietly in bed......I thought that I was
very courageous and adventurous. As I closed my eyes and fell into a deep
sleep that night I thought how nice it would be if I could take some "pill"
that would somehow get into my brain and muscles to assure a short cut to
reach the dance floor with a complete portfolio of Tango moves. I dreamed I
was a dashing Tango Dancer doing all those things I saw my teacher do with
his beautiful partner. I wondered where I was going to get my ten dollars
for next weeks class!
(To be continued.)

Arturo
West Palm Beach, Florida, USA




Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 05:33:03 -0800
From: luda_r1 <luda_r1@YAHOO.COM>
Subject: Thoughts on Tai Chi, martial arts, skiing, etc.

Several people commented on these topics recently.

One of the best two teachers in the area (SF) is a
martial arts practitioner. He says it has a profound
influence on his dancing. He's also the only one who
teaches technique around here. Exclusively. The other
one has been dancing tango since childhood.

I have practiced Tai Chi for several years, on and
off. It is a marvelous moving meditation in it's own
right. And it helps enhance tango, to. And vice versa.
Both require concentration, balance, shifting of
weight, being centered.

Skiing is similar in that, as Astrid points out, it
requires concentration, balance, shifting weight, and
being centered. :) Ahh...to see a skiier come "wedeln"
down the slopes! It's poetry in motion! So fluid. So
graceful. Just like tango. And it's a moving
meditation, too....just like tango.

Luda








Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2003 11:48:19 -0600
From: "Frank G. Williams" <frankw@MAIL.AHC.UMN.EDU>
Subject: random thoughts: Mauricio y Carla on the web

Heyo Friends,

Enjoying this discourse concerning the performance on Mauricio's Tango
Discovery web site...

Alberto S. writes:

>I think it is one of the best tango performances ever. Where he flows with

the music so well.

And Christian L. replies:

I can feel no connection in the couple at all (apart from that she just has
to follow ... *just to*). no communication at all ... she's used as an
object, not an subject. disculpe, but compared to what I have seen on the
video you linked I have seen much more tango'ier modern dance performances
...

My random thoughts:

1) When I've worked with Mauricio, some of the non-tango music he's tossed
on the boom box (No. Am. 'classics') has been sterile of tango emotion and
rooted in other musical traditions whose generic emotions I couldn't relate
to tango movement. Mauricio has had LOTS of musical training (and here in
the US). He is not INsensitive to the music, nor 'deaf' (i.e. unmusical, as
are some touted tango teachers). Musically, he is very sophisticated. The
question is where and how does the movement 'fit' the music?

2) The music in the video is relatively (melodically) abstract jazz.
Therefore, I would argue, the dance *is* modern jazz, using improvised tango
*movements*. Do they fit the music? IMHO, yes - in a rhythmic and
intellectual sense. As to the emotional sense, it's the rhythm and flow of
*communicated ideas* which play like an instrument. Although it looks
fairly abstract, at the level of 'playing', the emotional content inherent
to really free improvisation also fits the music.

3) Doesn't Carla ROCK??? Without her strong yet wonderfully facile
following, this couldn't work. The connection between them is like the
connection between hands while playing a fugue. Working together they
create a whole that is more than the sum of it's parts.

4) So, what *IS* musicality anyway? Is it simply mirroring sound with
movement? The more one does this, the more one will please the average
social follower. After all, if she also loves tango then she would like to
feel the sound of it drive her movements. Yet, there is a clear difference
between dancing with followers who do not know the music vs. dancing with
those who know it as well or better than yourself. The kind of
entertainment you provide by your interpretation in leading depends entirely
on what she 'expects' for that music. Without abandoning the idea of moving
comfortably, it's the 'play' of musical improvisation that makes the
communication enjoyable. Imagine abstracting elements of musicality by
several 'powers of 2' and you end up with Mauricio and Carla. It's dance.
It's intellectual. It's jazz. It's cool. It's origin is tango. It's not
intended for the milonga.

Regards to all,

Frank in Minneapolis

Frank G. Williams, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
612-625-6441

Department of Neuroscience
6-145 Jackson Hall
321 Church Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Department of Veterinary Pathobiology
205 Veterinary Science
1971 Commonwealth Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55108





Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2003 19:09:14 +0100
From: "Christian Lüthen" <christian.luethen@GMX.NET>
Subject: Re: random thoughts: Mauricio y Carla on the web

> and you end up with Mauricio and Carla.
> It's dance. It's intellectual. It's jazz. It's cool. It's origin is

tango.
true: it's *origin* is tango. but is it still tango??

> It's not intended for the milonga.

problem is: those attending the workshops are milonga tango dancers ...
... and will try to deploy it as "tango" during the next milonga ...
... beware !!! [this is dangerous!]

christian


ps.: as mentioned in my first posting: technically that's probably quite
brilliant ... therefore I might like to watch the video or attend a class. but I
could not sense any 'deeper connectionn' within the couple appart from
technique.

--
christian@eTanguero.net
http://www.eTanguero.net/

disclaimer: any opinion expressed is only based on my limited knowledge ...
though continously working on improving. ;-)


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Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2003 13:01:45 -0600
From: Stephen Brown <Stephen.P.Brown@DAL.FRB.ORG>
Subject: Re: random thoughts: Mauricio y Carla on the web

Frank wrote:

>>It's dance. It's intellectual. It's jazz. It's cool. It's origin
>>is tango.

Christian replied:

>true: it's *origin* is tango. but is it still tango??

Does it really matter whether Frank, Christian, or I choose to call a
particular dance exhibition tango or tango-related? It is still dance,
but even there one can push the envelope of definitions. Susan and I once
took part in a dance exhibition, where one of the dancers stayed in his
electric wheel chair.

One of the characteristics of innovators is to push the definition of what
is considered part of a genre. Sometimes they expand the genre. Sometimes
they create new forms.

The use of non-tango music for tango dancing at milongas may be another
issue. Social dancing does not usually push the definition of what is
considered part of a genre. At a milonga, it may matter what music we
play. Certainly the neo-tango artists have expanded the definition of
tango music, but dancing tango steps to non-tango music, such as Van
Morrison's Moondance, creates a much different experience than dancing
tango steps to tango music, whether the tango music is from the age or
later.

With best regards,
Steve

Stephen Brown
Tango Argentino de Tejas
http://www.tejastango.com/





Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2003 11:09:46 -0800
From: Carlos Rojas <Crojas@HACIENDACDC.ORG>
Subject: Re: random thoughts: Mauricio y Carla on the web

I think dancing tango steps to anything is OK, but please disclose that
you are dancing tango steps to whatever, and that tango is socially
danced to music that has a tango rhythm. Take the opportunity to bring
awareness to the beauty of this dance. Many new students see
performances of tango steps which often involve acrobatic skills or
ballet training, and when they come to dance, they get frustrated
because they can't do the steps they saw.

I think in the US we have a "taco bell" mentality. I used taco bell
because they claim that their food is Mexican, but those of us that have
in Mexico, know what real Mexican food is. I think the same happens in
tango, many of us do not take the time to study well and/or go to Buenos
Aires and learn before we pretend to dance or teach tango. Then since
we don't understand or like tango music, we change it and present it as
authentic.

Carlos Rojas
Portland, OR


-----Original Message-----



Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2003 11:02 AM
To: TANGO-L@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [TANGO-L] random thoughts: Mauricio y Carla on the web

Frank wrote:

>>It's dance. It's intellectual. It's jazz. It's cool. It's origin
>>is tango.

Christian replied:

>true: it's *origin* is tango. but is it still tango??

Does it really matter whether Frank, Christian, or I choose to call a
particular dance exhibition tango or tango-related? It is still dance,
but even there one can push the envelope of definitions. Susan and I
once
took part in a dance exhibition, where one of the dancers stayed in his
electric wheel chair.

One of the characteristics of innovators is to push the definition of
what
is considered part of a genre. Sometimes they expand the genre.
Sometimes
they create new forms.

The use of non-tango music for tango dancing at milongas may be another
issue. Social dancing does not usually push the definition of what is
considered part of a genre. At a milonga, it may matter what music we
play. Certainly the neo-tango artists have expanded the definition of
tango music, but dancing tango steps to non-tango music, such as Van
Morrison's Moondance, creates a much different experience than dancing
tango steps to tango music, whether the tango music is from the age or
later.

With best regards,
Steve

Stephen Brown
Tango Argentino de Tejas
http://www.tejastango.com/

LISTSERV@MITVMA.MIT.EDU.





Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 20:50:21 -0400
From: Keith Elshaw <keith@TOTANGO.NET>
Subject: Dj thoughts

Hello everyone;

There is a DJ Forum on ToTango (submissions welcome). I've just re-written
my piece and offer a portion here ...



"I like to have the light controls at my fingertips. It needs constant
attention as the milonga progresses. Light, sound and air are the
ingredients for the bubble I like to have dancers walk into. It should
strike you at the door or coming up.

Inside my bubble, time can slip into another dimension. You "lose" it
easily. The mood textures of the moments that keep flowing carry you off
somewhere before you know it.

When you fill the air with beautiful music, you create a tango womb. (Filled
with a bunch of twins)!

I let the orchestras play. I guide the spotlight from one bandstand to the
next. They play my requests. I ask for their best songs from a certain year
in an order that makes sense to dancers. (We took the time to clean and
enhance everything in advance).

Our milonga offers nourishment through diversity, challenge, surprise,
pleasure; the flow gracefully back and forth between new and old sounds. (I
wonder if anyone could play more old AND more new music?).

People say it's nice to hear upbeat tango when I work. I keep the mood
positive over-all rather than weepy. Moments of intense emotion need to be
relaxed. The easiest way to do this is to be generous with instrumentals.

Because I'm always on the move, everyone's tastes are catered to in a timely
fashion. I watch the floor like a hawk and make note of who likes what. Just
seeing a face will tell me what orchestra to call up now, or soon.

We glide from mood to mood with each new tanda. Gut feelings lead. I mostly
jump right on requests, because that's part of playing the room and making
everyone happy. I figure if this person wants this now, chances are someone
else wants it, too.

Salsa and Latin, Swing, Blues, Rock 'n Roll all have a moment when they
should come on for release and refresh from the tango tension.

I might then go into a modern set. Gotan. Piazzolla. Ziegler. Little special
things: Myriam Alter. Esteban Morgado. Gypsy Boogaloo. Rava. OM Lounge.
Could be Louis Armstrong. Short, whatever it is. Always moving forward.

Usually, I go to vals to bring back the traditional music. Anyone that's
been sitting will jump right up. I will probably then go to a Big 8
Orchestra. Or quite often, Donato.

So, in the last 40 minutes, we've pleased all the ones who want salsa, etc,
nuevo, even vals/tango traditionalists. Now we can run with Golden Era for a
while."

------------------------

(The article goes on.)

------------------------

Perhaps I will find a better way to describe it than as a bubble. If the
acoustics and lighting are right, there is a place where it all gets carried
away emotionally if you hit on just the right songs in the right order. I
swear! The whole milonga takes on a dreamy quality.

Well, this I wish for you!


I will be in Tampa for Victor Crichton's Valentine weekend celebration and
at Lydia Henson's Miami Tango Fantasy Memorial week. Yes, I bring the womb
with me.


Best as always,

Keith


http://ToTANGO.net/ttindex.html




Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 10:30:27 -0700
From: jackie ling wong <jackie.wong@VERIZON.NET>
Subject: adding my thoughts to the thread

greetings everyone..

in teaching tango i have found that two issues which repeatedly occur are....

fast followers and fast leaders

i've thought about this for a long time and have come up with several theories and ways to help

first....in classes instructors tend to teach the follower's part of a sequence and then she does it without being led...and i find that =
leaders will dance in sequences..first combination...walk...another combination...walk...to me it feels boring and stiff..certainly not =
musical

i solve this by not teaching any sequences which i translate to mean a combination of steps...what i teach is a theme...for example - foot =
drags....

i define it, demonstrate it, talk about the follower's and leader's technique, and then allow the students (both follower and leader) to =
discover where in their dance it fixes... if the student can own it in their dance and it fits naturally into what they already know, they can =
now feel comfortable enough with it that they can use it... this also encourages the follower to participate in the exploration of the dance.

then at the end the students demonstrate what they have discovered and i demonstrate the ways in which i use foot drags...during the practica, we =
trade ideas and talk and actually practice.

i do not teach the basic 8 step at all.
i don't for several reasons ...first it becomes mechanical for followers and leaders so they don't follow or lead...second, stepping back is not =
recommended...and third, it prevents students from focusing on dancing..

think about it...your student messes up on step 3...what do they do?...they go back to step 1...when really they should learn to keep =
walking...for the leader to make adjustments and to learn how to find the follower..

besides, i emphasize connection right away in my beginner classes...because if you ask them, "what adjectives would you use for =
tango?", you will always hear sensual, connection, passion...so connection comes with a smooth clear walk..ah...i love to just walk...

i do not teach the "follower's part"...i teach technique ...which is different.,..many times my reply to follower's when asked..."what do we =
do?" is "listen, focus and follow. think about your axis, your balance, your technique, relaxation,"

at one workshop i do, i show the follower's steps to the leaders and ask them to lead their follower into those steps..what happens is it gets =
the leader "out" of their feet and into placement of the follower. what is interesting is that several possibilities always come out of =
this...and it slows the leaders down..

there's more but i have to go practice with a friend..i hope my thoughts are clear.
jackie
www.tangopulse.net





Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2005 08:51:34 -0400
From: v0orbuwg1l <gr1ndm1t0u@GMAIL.COM>
Subject: Re: Thoughts on Intimacy

On 8/11/05, Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring@gmail.com> wrote:

> Intimacy, my dear pal, requires touching each other.

Intimacy is a richness that may also be shared in a look, in a smile,
in letters - some published letter collections provide extraordinary
insights in what intimacy is. Intimacy may also be shared in a
telephone conversation, and why not

> Why not go one step further and admire your partner from across the
> room

by beholding your beloved from across the room?


Cheers...




Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2005 10:18:17 -0600
From: Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring@GMAIL.COM>
Subject: Re: Thoughts on Intimacy

No disagreement there. One can have intimate thoughts.

Dream on, take two.

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
http://TangoSpring.com



On 8/12/05, v0orbuwg1l <gr1ndm1t0u@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 8/11/05, Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Intimacy, my dear pal, requires touching each other.
>
> Intimacy is a richness that may also be shared in a look, in a smile,
> in letters - some published letter collections provide extraordinary
> insights in what intimacy is. Intimacy may also be shared in a
> telephone conversation, and why not
>
> > Why not go one step further and admire your partner from across the
> > room
>
> by beholding your beloved from across the room?
>
>
> Cheers...
>




Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2005 12:44:51 -0400
From: v0orbugw1l <gr1ndm1t0u@GMAIL.COM>
Subject: Re: Thoughts on Intimacy

I was just thinking to stop reading Tango-L and my "contributions" to
it, when I got Oleh's response to my musings.

On 8/12/05, Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring@gmail.com> wrote:

> No disagreement there. One can have intimate thoughts.
>
> Dream on, take two.

Interesting... Does his cynical message underscore what I always
thought about Argentinians and their culture? More warmth, more
romance, more appreciation of the opposite sex, more intimacy in
relationships, more sincere friendships, more gaiety, more sorrow. All
this being summed up in the Tango. And the reason that only its form
can be exported, not its spirit...

Adios!




Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2009 08:59:16 +1100
From: "Vince Bagusauskas" <vytis@hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Thoughts?
To: <tango-l@mit.edu>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEmZSBr15lA








Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2009 22:49:00 +0000
From: Sergio Vandekier <sergiovandekier990@hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tango-L] Thoughts
To: Tango-L List <tango-l@mit.edu>


When I see somebody like Fabrizio Forti dancing I think...

He is dancing "traditional tango" The way we all danced in my neighborhood. Long steps, an elastic embrace, in "V", close for walking and with more opening to execute certain figures. Stepping either toe first (most people) or heel first (many).

Utilizing all the elements of tango, embellishments, some colgadas, some soltadas with change of embrace, some volcadas, etc.

I think "What a beautiful dance our tango is".

Best regards, Sergio

PS. This style is not for crowded dance floors.
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